Review: Meek Mill – Dreamchasers 2

Review: Meek Mill - Dreamchasers 2

For an artist, one of the best possible tools is consistency. Saturating the fans with the product they yearn for in new and exciting ways is the winning formula to building a solid fan base in music. This is captured in various projects that an artist (or group of artists) can release. As the music is released, the appeal grows thus creating more faith in the artist to create fresh, more advanced sounds and still manage to appeal to the same fans who were there from the beginning simultaneously attracting new listeners.

The idea of consistency is used more than ever these days, especially by newer artists. Big Sean for example, released various ‘Finally Famous’ mixtapes to solidify his talent in the eyes of his growing supporters. Wiz Khalifa is another example, with various tapes to satisfy the heap of fans as well as Wale. Most recently Meek Mill has been known for his capabilities in the streets of Philadelphia for his constant mixtape installments and after being discovered and signed by Rick RossMaybach Music Group, the young artist has garnered a buzz unlike any other currently, riding high off of his 1st solo effort since the signing, the DreamChasers mixtape. Now Meek is providing the second edition of the DreamChasers series, hoping to maintain the great expectations the fans have for him as we approach his debut album Dreams & Nightmares releasing this summer but the question is, does DreamChasers 2 accomplish the goal placed before it?

Right back like I never left…

An enthusiastic Meek Mill is hungry on the Intro to his project, exploding on the simple track with slick lines that make him so appealing lyrically in the first place. The Mike Tyson sample in the beginning sets a calm yet fearsome tone for the tape, one that compliments the lines Meek throws all over the track.

Ready or not, here I come, You can’t hide, n*gga I’m too damn fly…

An explosion at the end of the Intro carries over into the second track ‘Ready or Not’ as all goes quiet and the beat is sprinkled on subtly. A reflective moment is shared by DJ Drama before the familiar sample from ‘The Score’ reveals itself for Meek Mill to carry himself on. Well executed, Meek manages to deliver his own quality of lyricism and braggadocio while elevating himself to another level with a sample as prestigious as The Fugees. One of the better tracks on the entire project, the mixtape kicks off to a great start.

Churrrch, preeach…

With an assist from the Young Money‘s anomaly Drake, Meek Mill‘s “Amen” is a very cheerful fun track that encourages repeat listens with the recently mute Jeremih crooning ad-libs throughout the verses. Meek and Drake respectively share what they’re thankful for and it turns out as a stand out piece of the project.

Let that sh*t BURN!

Radical and extreme at the least, Meek Mill and Big Sean both let loose on this track that they both claim as theirs. The loud and mean “Burn” has Meek and Sean trading off left and right on verses with the occasional hook but it’s the G.O.O.D Music native who snaps on his slots, outshining the dream chaser by the time the track comes to an end.

A1 Everything…

A solid beat and a appropriate verse by Meek Mill hits in the beginning but it’s Compton‘s own Kendrick Lamar who tells the viewer to “sleep on him if you want to take a dirt nap”. He grinds the beat to dust and steals the spotlight for the latter of the track with a hard verse and an intimidating flow. This record belongs to TDE‘s own.

I used to be a used to…

With a emotionally powerful beat, Meek manages to switch up from the vigorous hard beats to the soulful and realistic struggle. A look into what he experienced without necessarily becoming a autobiography of sorts, Meek reflects on experiences from raising his child to dodging bullets to the struggle that comes with trying to make it out of the hood, trying to make money without losing his family. Although the idea of his come up has been done before, the concept hasn’t been done to death with his words yet and for that it turns out as a great record.

I be Flexin, Flexin, Flexin on these b*tches…

Originally the second release from Meek Mill before we had any idea of what DreamChasers 2 would sound like, Flexin is very normal and just blends in with the rest of the tape, if not just mediocre. Catchy, yet lyrically and beat wise far from the most impressive track on the tape.

I’m counting green in my money machine, that sh*t sound like I typewrite…

The beat feels lazy and the lyrics fail to capture with a feature from Travis Scott, the underwhelming “I Get It” feels more like a filler track than anything. This is more worthy of a skip than anything else and brings down the quality of the tape.

I make a hater wanna kill himself, suicide…

Sadly similar to the track before it except assisted by Rick Ross, this track feels like the least impressive Ross and Meek collaboration yet. The flow and verses only slightly improve from the track before it. Otherwise it feels like it’s another filler track, one that doesn’t particularly impress in any field whatsoever.

All these B*tches call me…

Chanting the hook from he start, Meek brings on Fabolous and French Montana for a track that slightly revives the presence of dope tracks on this tape. “Racked Up Shawty” is fitting although lacking in much of the main artist’s presence. Fabolous stays a step ahead of French and Meek here, taking the lead during the middle verse and being the most memorable entertainer on the record. Besides the infectious hook, Loso remains the best here by the end of the track after a verse from French Montana that fails to make a impact.

Lean wit it, Rock wit it…

Feeling like an improved version of “Flexin”, the first release from DreamChasers 2 has a beat that lurks in the beginning but explodes with Meek Mill bars that are vintage in terms of his style. Not exactly crammed with actual content, the verses come laced with stunt rap, which is expected and safe as a release for a buzz builder prior to a mixtape’s release. Nonetheless, the presence of these tracks aren’t unnecessary and “Lean Wit It” is enjoyable.

If you ain’t got a dream, you ain’t got nothin…

It feels like “Big Dreams” was supposed to be in the lane of “Used to Be” but possibly more play friendly, but here it doesn’t really come off effective. It seems like it’s unsure of it’s purpose both on the tape and in general in terms of it’s message. It feels like Meek was attempting to make it into something personal and failed along the way. It carries some quality to it but overall it doesn’t deliver.

I wonder if I take you home…

One for the ladies, Meek proves he can cross barriers by bringing Wale and Big Sean with him on a song to pursue women. The placement on the tape is a bit unorthodox but the track itself is very good with Big Sean going 2 for 2 on Meek‘s tape, appearing last on the track and robbing the MMG duo of their shine entirely.

24, how could I ask for more…

At this point Meek borrows Drake‘s closing track off of his sophomore project Take Care and takes the record as a chance to tell some stories, between his own and those who can’t succeed in the environment he managed to survive. While the track isn’t likely to be one that will bring in new listeners, older fans of Meek Mill will appreciate this.

Face Down…

Wale, Sam Sneaker and the abysmal Trey Songz tag along for Meek‘s “Face Down”, a sluggish let down of a song. The beat is uninspired and the only thing worse is really Songz’ effort on the track. Far from lazy, it’s more like a strong attempt as being bad. Wale‘s verse is ordinary, and the rest is just middle of the road quality. It essentially one of the tracks you won’t regret skipping.

So tell a friend to tell a friend to tell a friend to tell a friend…

Feeling more like an B level anthem, Meek Mill, 2 Chainz and Louie V team up for “Str8 Like That” which has a beat that carries it along more than anything. The verse from multiple necklaces that is placed between the two Meek verses is even less contagious than most verses he leaves for a feature, and Meek‘s subject matter is sufficient but not extraordinary.

I TELL HER MEET ME IN THE BATHROOM!

If you didn’t think Meek Mill could get any louder on a verse, he catapults into the House Party Remix with the same opening line as the original, his voice higher in level if you can believe it but I digress, this is amusing. Meek‘s verse is decent, Wale and Fabolous do great on the beat and the surprise entrant, Mac Miller coasts over the instrumental as well.

Look into my eyes, tell me what you see, a young’n full of pride with the intentions of a G…

A beat that is only as good as the lyricist on it, Meek Mill comes in on the short track with an impressive two verses defining his hunger his objective. Quality over quantity, this is good.

And I be On My Way…

Upbeat and ambitious, “On My Way” glows in the dark, feeling only slightly like “She Likes It” from the first DreamChasers release. Nonetheless, it’s catchy and feels like a fitting sign to signal the end of a project.

Like a F*ckin magic trick, Hocus Pocus…

Closing with a beat that’s similar to the intro in terms of his vibe and feel, Meek beats the instrumental into submission with pure lyrics and a flow that reminds the listener of Meek‘s abilities.

It’s without question that while DreamChasers was holding the fans over, Meek Mill has been working to put out more tracks for the fans, and even through the rate of his growth is questionable (there may not be too much to his defense in terms of that here) the real problem here is the amount of tracks. The idea of quality over quantity should always be adhered to and the death of this tape is the fact that it starts off strong and is so weak right before the end, that it’s just saddening. More then 3-5 tracks could’ve been left off and would’ve made this tape hit a lot harder but the overload only turned out to hurt the project as a whole, making it a lot less effective. The tracks that do blast off here however are great, and reminds you of why Ross is pushing Meek to release Dreams & Nightmares this Summer but for now, the fans can enjoy DreamChasers 2, a worthwhile show of Meek‘s skill in the booth.


OVERALL:7.5/10
Timeless Tracks: Ready or Not, Amen, A1 Everything, Burn…damn near the entire first half of the tape.

You can download DreamChasers 2 here.

Meek Mill‘s long awaited debut album Dreams & Nightmares releases August 28th.

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  • MyMindBeenGone

    Check out the homie @iTimeless ‘s review of Meek Mill’s Dreamchasers 2 http://t.co/2GMsiTNU