Politics in Hip Hop are lethal. The idea behind how a label wants you to be and the image they want you to fulfill is one of many reasons why in this day and age, artists choose to build their own following being themselves rather than using what a label has to offer. Creating your own team that both the fans, and your own group can relate to is something key artists do in this generation to further along their abilities to create freely. Teams like A$AP, Odd Future, Azaleans, and more have started to come into fruition, both for the people to represent showing their preference in music, to create a fan base and to label the unit in which the artist keeps his or her circle. One team however, has grown at a rapid rate and is debatably the most influential crowd out as of right now: Taylor Gang.

Toting the “Taylor Gang or Die” (TGOD) phrase from the start, Taylor Gang general Wiz Khalifa has quietly built his brand making business deals, smoking weed, touring and most importantly, delivering impressive music to the masses, making room for fans to appreciate his music, old and new. Being the creator of a following led specifically by him, he put himself in a position where his decisions are what matter, not what people decide for him. For example, his decision to randomly release the ‘Cabin Fever’ mixtape last year was one of his own ruling, a verdict that garnered him a large amount of praise however, the album that followed titled ‘Rolling Papers’ wasn’t as welcomed, as the project seemed too pop-like for listeners. Now, early in the year Wiz Khalifa has another mixtape he has recently released titled “Taylor Allderdice” for his growing fanbase to appreciate, leaving the question: Is Wiz Khalifa’s musical focus (and freedom to create) still a blessing?


…Even though we ain’t supposed to be livin’ anywhere close to these people
How they gon’ hate on me, I got more bread than most of these people…

Hosted by Rob Markman, the tape opens with him introducing himself before the beat drops. “Amber Ice” is a soothing tone assisted by Khalifa’s hypnotizing voice in the hook and a verse surrounding his positivity and his recognition of where he stands now in comparison with those who stand there with him. The end of the track surrounds a snippet of an interview between Markman and Khalifa where Rob mentions that he sees Khalifa building a team, and Wiz agrees and enforces the idea of his spirit being worldwide, sharing it with everyone.

Cause this a muthafuckin’ life that you can’t live at all, I’m getting high while I drive, I ain’t thinking of y’all…

“California” balances the the big and the little things on Wiz’s mind, from phone calls to his sister to his awareness of the fake in the industry. His idea of just wanting to “ride around with the top down and smoke weed with his n*ggas” is something that he can’t do as easily as he could before he arrived at this level. The end of the track has another clip attached to the end where Wiz tells the listeners that his brand as a whole is “still a cohesive thing” and that the world he is trying to create with it is nothing without the fans.

Smoke Trees, Smoke Trees, Smoke Trees, Smoke Trees…

A track that carries a nice chill beat is loaded with weed talk, something that Wiz Khalifa is far from unfamiliar with. The subject matter of the track doesn’t make it impossible to enjoy, however the assumption can be made that it’s more enjoyable when you’re high. The clip at the end makes it worth listening to more than anything, as Markman mentions that Khalifa’s been a hot topic with his unit, and Wiz responds by telling him that labels know how to manifest millions off of a spark of creativity but don’t have the creativity to begin with. Something that he clearly has.

When you think of who came in here bought anything they wanted, you thinkin’ bout us…

Easily one of the best tracks on the project, “Guilty Conscience” has Wiz Khalifa focusing more on his bragging style, reminding rappers of what he’s doing and what he’s done while incorporating his usual weed references in his lyricism, backed by a solid beat that reinforces Khalifa’s ability to make a great hook. This time the clip at the end focuses on something we don’t see from too many artists, a flaw put in the spotlight. Wiz notes that ‘Rolling Papers’ was an experiment, a learning experience that helped him progress as an artist.

You niggas ain’t got it naw, you niggas just ain’t you…

An ode to Khalifa’s vice, short and sweet. Littered with little solid references and good points such as how he has noticed other rappers copying him, the track for the most part is great, with the addition of a clip at the end of Markman speaking on how he feels like personally its an ode to Kush and OJ (arguably one of Khalifa’s best mixtapes if not his best) and how he feels it takes it to another level. Wiz agrees noting that’s what it’s all about: Taking it to another level.

You won’t end up giving it back if you had this for one night…

“ONIFC” (Only Nigga In First Class) is the title of Khalifa’s next album and also the title of the track, a solid song that serves almost as prelude to the project. It surrounds the allure of the finer things and living the good life, noting how it’d be impossible to give it back if you had it for just one night. The clip at the end speaks on being a celebrity and Wiz delivers the idea that the same things that inspired him before inspire him now and thats just Life.

Lifestyles of the rich and famous, while I’m rich and famous… If you don’t you’re nameless…

A chill beat with a real point to deliver, Khalifa (assisted by Taylor Gang original Chevy Woods) bring in the idea that they know what they’re doing when it comes to making tracks with “Nameless”. Money brings importance and they bring that idea to the forefront here.

I pray we all livin’ so lavish…

Blurring the line between the catchy sound of todays generation and Wiz Khalifa’s own unique reverberation, “Never Been Part II” is about the life they never want to give up, while achieving what they haven’t been able to do thus far. Assisted by Rick Ross and his fiance’ Amber Rose, the track overall is a nice blend between the two rappers but manages to stay firmly in the lane of Khalifa’s style.

Got the windows down, radio’s on…

Sampling the haunting yet catchy Frank Ocean on “Acura Integurl” for the hook, Wiz Khalifa stands alone on the verses for “The Cruise” one of the better records on the project. Experimenting is alive and well here, as Khalifa takes to singing and using melodies in his rapping more than ever on this track but it helps more than it hinders as a whole. The track ends with Markman recognizing Khalifa’s spot as #11 in terms of highest earning rappers and Wiz notes that he’s not even trying.

Mackin, Hangin, Rowland, gettin’ that paper…

Easy to bump to although the same subject matter, “Rowland” surrounds weed, and living to a degree however this feels fresher with the addition of Smoke Dza. The clip at the end shows Rob distinguishing the fact that everyone has a different opinion of him and Wiz quickly says that if people can’t see his Pittsburgh influences, then they aren’t built to see it at all, from song writing to beat selection.

When you living this high, you can’t be afraid of heights…

The noise maker on the project, “My Favorite Song (Spendin’)” is catchy and has Wiz on his stunt rap mode. He reminds the opposition that when spending money is the competition, he does it all too well. Tacked on is a verse from one of the older members in Taylor Gang (and most likely the oldest) Juicy J. The next portion of the interview at the end focuses on Wiz reminding individuals that he drops 30 racks in the club on champagne and it’s nothing. His ability to do that, is why Juicy is with Taylor Gang in the first place.

Take a Plane…

The beat hits hard and the hook is effective, “Take a Plane” is probably going to be the term people will be using in the future for getting high, especially considering the obvious subject matter that Wiz and Juicy speak on in the track but nonetheless it’s solid. The clip at the end has Khalifa letting the people know that they’re a collective, and everyone in the group serves their own purpose to make the team even better.

Now that’s TAYLORRRR!

The features come in heavy now as Juicy J, Chevy Woods and Lola Monroe come in to assist the Taylor Gang Warlord for “The Code”. The hook has Khalifa’s voice acting as a siren for the Taylor Gang with a little addition in terms of a verse as the other three offer more bars over the beat. A selfless move by Khalifa, as this is one of the better beats on the project and It was an effective move. It makes it much easier for his fans to get used to (and enjoy) what TG has to offer besides Wiz. He says they’re a collective and this shows that for sure. The clip at the end lets him speak on his insane growth, from a kid from Pittsburgh to being put up here with “big niggas names” as he puts it.

I swear ain’t nobody do me no favors…

A solid beat produced by Jake One filled with the usual standard braggadocio from Wiz. It feels more like an interlude due to it’s lack of a hook and it’s length, but nonetheless it’s a good listen and only compliments the project. The clip at the end reveals the short point that Wiz knows everyone will always look at him and his team like they don’t belong.

I got so many things running through my mind…

The Instrumental on chill, the hook focused on being able to unwind, and the verses only add on to the same idea. The track overall is cool but feels like it’s purpose is to only be a filler. The clip towards the end has Khalifa speak on the idea of being a Taylor (doing whatever they want) and how when he feels something is becoming the norm, he strays away from it.

Playing my newest shit, and you know its bumpin’, You ain’t used to it, you gon grow accustomed…

The beat on “Number 16” (Produced by Dumont) is one that is only as good as the artist’s ability to shine on it and with that said, Wiz makes this a standout record despite it’s uninspired name. The hook especially makes it worth listening to. Although not inspiring, Khalifa’s ability to construct great music with his voice alone is worth applauding. The clip at the end of this hit has Wiz discussing the fact that he knows the haters out there want what hes got.

You hatin’ mother fuckers know what time it is…

A nice way to wrap up the project, the midtempo “Blindfolds” wraps up with Khalifa and Juicy J bringing in the idea that they will continue to be real and live what they consider to be the life of a Taylor. The final clip shows Rob Markman reminding the fans of whats to come, Juicy J, Chevy Woods and last but not least, Wiz Khalifa and his O.N.I.F.C album which is soon to come.

Individuality is key. Not only in life, but in music as well and Wiz Khalifa has managed to separate himself from everyone else. Between catchy hooks, well constructed verses and rewarding experiments, Wiz really only lacks in his slightly repetitive subject matter and borderline filler tracks however, that’s nothing to complain about when you consider the project as a whole. A well done mixtape from Wiz Khalifa is what we were blessed with, containing more than just good music, but a look into Taylor Gang on a deeper level beyond hearing the phrase yelled on a track. If this is just the mixtape, I’m excited for what O.N.I.F.C has in store.


Overall: 8.5/10
Timeless Tracks: My Favorite Song, Number 16, The Code, The Cruise, Guilty Conscience

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